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stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the
than expected. >> every month we waste makes protecting the environment more expensive and increases the problems for the people whose lives have already been adversely affected. we have no time to lose. >> even germany, considered a leader on environmental protection, has come under criticism. the mayan minister could not live up to his promise. environmental groups say it is largely down to chancellor angela merkel. >> merkel has not use her voice strongly enough, and that is why the situation in the eu is so critical. it is lacking a leader, and effects are being felt everywhere. >> climate experts warn that if emissions do not sink in the coming years, the consequences will be dire. a new climate treaty is due before 2020, but after events in doha, that is looking more unlikely than ever. >> as we saw in that report, the german environment minister is playing a key role in the climate talks. we asked if he thought there would be a breakthrough. >> first of all, we are in the middle of a very, very important and difficult negotiation process. i expect negotiations going on all day
as a broader environmental issue, but even water bottles, even if you leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a sol
environments. then you are able to deliver a new, interesting experience. you have the information that we all love, but also married that with the pipe. i hopefully -- i hope that you can create new experiences. >> from time warner, they predicted that all channels will be like hbo. subscription-based. >> people say that. >> he did not say all cards -- ala carte. >> i didn't think that he would. what that means is that people will have an anywhere anytime approach to the television device. my show is on at 7:30. i am angry with my mother because we are out shopping and if we do not get back in the next 20 minutes, i am going to mess it -- i'm going to miss it. and i am not going to have any ability to catch up to it or see it again. no child today has that experience, first of all, already. but the new dimension that is going to come into that is the devices. the ability to get to all of these other things. which is what you see people talking about software and i.t. meaning if i can speak the language of all these devices, then i can put this into all computing devices. and then you have the
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
on the overall security environment on the peninsula as well as in asia. >> did you follow up anything new? we been hearing rumblings for a time. anything new you can provide in terms of insight into lunches are things like that? >> i think you're tracking it pretty well for the media today there are indications of what they will call a satellite launch. we believe it is still the u.n. security resolutions because of the missile they'll be fired and the implications it has for ballistic missiles activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact it will have on the security environment throughout the region, not just dependent. >> can you follow up on some of that? what is your assessment? they say they saw birth of her problems at their failed launch. what is your assessment? how could they have felt the problems? juicier ran possibly helping them? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard-liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th, which is widely reported i
. and so you know this is basically being in an environment where i have a whole life based upon secondhand smoke and curry. so whatever other kind of life i have got, that is going to be the heart of my life. and i don't think that this being sprung upon me is fair to me, fair to my tenants or fair to other people on the block that will be experiencing the same kind of secondhand smoke. and so my belief is that when this thing was a coffee shop and a sandwich shop, that was a fine use of the space. it's a tiny space in a residential area and i would request of you and believe that this is best zoned for that use. the previous owner ran it as an internet cafe. and so everybody sat there all day and never bought anything. if you weren't running it as an internet cafe and my request is that you deny this permit, revoke this permit. economically, this is [kwhra-/] i have got in life and now you have a situation where this guy wants to run a curry factory i lose significant value in what i have got. medically i have to report it to people that they are being poisoned by the smoke and what abou
survivors are very concerned with being able to control their presence environment because they were not able to control their environment when they were traumatized. >> can you see? >> no, i'm blindfolded. >> reporter: this trust exercise forces justin to give up control to his partner. >> horse on your right. keep walking. you're fine. >> okay. >> reporter: the goal? to expose his old wounds. >> can he relate to you, do you think? >> yeah. >> reporter: watch how danny sets the stage for a major breakthrough. >> i went through a very difficult time, as well. very traumatic situation. it seemed so stupid at first and then it was actually helpful. therapeutic. you're okay. you're going to do just fine. >> and it was a breakthrough. it would have been taken me a year if i was meeting with justin in my office. >> reporter: lyz said she had never seen justin so vulnerable. two weeks later, one final exercise. it's aimed with justin coping his past. >> you abandoned all of us. i had to be the man of the family. >> reporter: inside the pen, justin is 9 years old again. the age when his sis
in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years sea-going experience serving across various frig
. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work excavate play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then you go into the room and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to watch what is going to emer
legislation, a couple of weeks ago, tony testified in front of the environment and public works committee on why we need to pass and get the safe cosmetics out there on the floor of that senate, he did a fantastic job and i stole this off the video which is archiving, you can watch it, and this act would call for quick action on the chemicals of greatest concern, would increase access to basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not li
and i think what you are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional pane
for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in californi
the department of the environment to retroactively accept and expend a grant in the amount of $250,000 from the sidney e. frank foundation to plan and implement specific projects to source 100% of san francisco's electrical demand from renewable energy sources from july 15, 2012, through june 15, 2013. >> thank you very much. >> supervisors, guillermo [speaker not understood] with the department of environment. the department encourages the committee to approve and recommend the accept and expend grant from the sidney e. frank foundation for $250,000. the grant will enable the department of the environment to continue developing plans for san francisco to be 100% of its electricity demand from renewable energy qu sources. * meet currently the city-wide profile is 41% renewable. the department will draw upon recommendations contained in a recently completed mayor's renewable energy task force report. among the supported programs will be initiatives to expand in city renewables, primarily solar systems, advance regulatory changes to accelerate implementation of renewable projects, encourage
smiling, playing, and learning together in a safe environment. but here is the surprise. this isn't america, it's tijuana, mexico. a tough place for a child due to drugs, violence and poverty. but the first club is helping to change lives. and this is the first boys and girls club in south africa, lives are changed here and in mexico, because the children are learning that great futures start here. the expansion of the dream is due to the vision of tupperware brand's ceo, rick and his wife susan. for more than 20 years, he's been encouraging the company to make a difference through global and social responsibility. >> i think there's really a change in the role of what-- in the social contract between individuals and their governments. a lot of governments are going broke, there's a time here where corporations need to step up and find a way, not just to fund, but to put their focus, when you put funds and focus behind it, then things start to happen. >> tupperware is proof that some big businesses are big on helping others, since 1992, tupperware has been one of the leading corpo
country's most vulnerable people that we create healthy environments and green spaces and by country men and women become fully conscious of their ability to change things for the better. >> baptist from haiti. my wish is for more justice, economic as well as social justice, starting with the recognition that poverty is not a sin. >> i wish for wish for a world without boarders and walls, age 53, argentina. [ applause ] >> i wish for a world where the children are more just and more kind and fair in the world than the one we know. president, barack obama. >> and now, this is a good one, that donna and i can very strongly identify with. i wish that male fashion designers would be forced to wear the things that they create for women like stelleto heals and it gets better. and that all politicians would have to live by the rules and laws they come up with for the rest of us like the ones on food stamps and the minimum wage by isabel, ienda >> i promise that i will not take my clothes off in public. >> i wish it would snow in the morning so nobody does not have to go to school for two weeks,
in these type of environments and we were able to really take those and learn more about each other for future responses. we were able to take and provide a taylored response package to better serve the customer. again, we don't want to go in with a full package that the state or civil environments aren't really asking for, we want to be sure it's taylored appropriately and it's responsive and timely. we also had the humanitarian assistance coordination center. that's the place we were able to take the non-governmental agencies and the hoetion nation international agencies and have them interacting and coordinating with the military folks so that we were able to provide an understanding of how we all work together. so if you want additional information, if you want to talk to captain napalitano, he is the commanding officer for the expeditionary training group, and he is the -- in charge of the people that train and certify that crisis response adaptive force package. his folks also put together the different events for this, for the exercise. the apan provides us an opportunity to be able
environment we have currently. and the series b bonds will be longer term debts up to 30 years and that's estimated at right around 4%. a little more details on the refunding. again, this is meant to take out our 2003 bonds, current -- if current market conditions stay as they currently are, we're anticipating a net present value savings of 14% which is pretty extraordinary, or about $31 million of savings coming back to the rate payer. again, just like mortgages and that sort of thing, we're refunding our bonds to the lower interest rate environment. there are some details on what we'll be refunding in terms of the current debt and the charter provides the authorization for us to bring this forward for your consideration. in term of the new money bonds, we're spending approximately as i mentioned $420 million authorization. that's mainly to fund projects that were appropriated in fiscal 11 and fiscal 12. so, again, we're just in time financing here. we're bringing forward this transaction for your consideration as we need the monies. and then just over $100 million is needed for curren
we are decreasing our carbon emissions and achieve a sustainable environment. for instance this requires all new buildings designed to meet the gas reduction goals. that means more than 6 million square feet of commercial space and 11,000 housing units all in the development pipeline have been designed using these principles. [applause] in fact san francisco was recently recognized by the world green building council as having the greenest building policy by any local level in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco public utilities commission has
. >> it ensures tenant safety and access, a pleasant living environment and property security and which also complis with the rules for life safety and handicapped access. as illustrated in my brief, the overwhelming majorities within the upper tenderloin and nob hill neighborhoods have gates to prevent unauthorized access from the street. this security measure protects tenants and property. the gates allow for authorized access while stopping negotiate activities such as prostitution, drug use, graffiti, urniation and defecation, trash dumping and camping by homeless in the space. these activitis were commonplace before a gate preventing unauthorized access. since the implementation of the august 15th, 2012 ruling that gate remain open from 7:30 a.m. to 6:p.m., conditions in the alley have started to deteriorate. and the alley is once again being used for some of the negative activities described above. photos illustrate something of the occurrences are included in my brief. i also have photos illustrating negative activities that have occurred in the alley after i submitted my brief, with
up. in today'g environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management . >> clayton: i6789 >> predictions. >> making me want to drink, i doubt i'm alone. >> and brown foreman. >> bull or bear on jack. >> i'm bearish. >> brenda: your prediction. >> i like mattel, i think it's going to have a great christmas and i own the stock by the way, i think all-time high in february of next year. >> brenda: toby, bull or bear. >> coal in your stocking. >> brenda: what do you like, toby. >> it benefits from them, i like them
legalized by a number of regions. even the spanish environment ministry is backing the move, hoping to see a rise in takings in national parks as a result of people buying hunting permits, but animal rights activists are far from happy, calling the horseback hunting savage. >> this is a story from spain about wild boars and a controversial method of hunting them. but it is also a story about a country in crisis and how one is sacrificed for the good of the other. this is a member of the old gentry. hunting has been in his family's blood for generations. he is helping revive the tradition of hunting wild boar on horseback with spears. the sport, known as pigsticking, was long banned, but he has legalize it again. as chairman of the pigsticking international club, he wants to use the hunt as a way to draw tourists to the region. hunters pay at least 5000 euros per team to take part, money the locals could really use, so he prays to god to save spain and give people jobs. >> in our region, this really could be a way out of the crisis. we hope to get customers from abroad interested in the hun
-style? >> 80% is life-style and environment, which i think is really the important part. >> the thing that people point to here in the united states is stress. and it is a vague term, and means different things to different people. is -- stress here in the united states, obviously, we know what it is like. what is it like in other places? is there less stress, did you find for example in icaria? >> yes, you tell people you find this blue zone in the middle of of the mediterranean, and people say yeah, if i live in a place like that, i wouldn't have stress. but the reality is they have worries about kids, finances and healths. but what they have that we don't have are daily rituals to shed that stress, in some blue zones, it is simply prayer, other areas, what their families do. in other places, taking a nap. we know that people that take a nap at least five days a week have a third less heart disease problem than people that don't take a nap. it is 15 days to unwind the stress. >> i would love to be able to do that. >> it is hard, but there are things you mentioned, as well. i found i
the great animal orchestra about the sounds animals make in the environment, and he broke it down and said, look, in an environment that remains stable, insects take this frequency bandwidth and the mammals are kind of here, and the monkeys or whatever are here, the birds are in here. they have it worked out and as if it is lines of music and all playing their parts and they don't intrude on the others. >> rose: yes. >> and it was kind of a huge insight and i thought that is absolutely right. yeah. >> rose: tell me about the role of brian eno. >> he is -- he was instrumental in kind of pushing talking heads as a band. >> rose: right. >> beyond what we were used to doing. and then he and i worked together as collaborators, as collaborators before. he is not entirely but to some extent he is a nonmusician, he actually can play an instrument but he prefers to think of himself as a nonmusician so he prefers to work and think of how the music is organized as opposed to sitting and jamming with somebody. >> you are now collaborating with annie clark. >> yes. >> rose: how is that going? >> it has
and be informed in an entertaining, fun environment, in a safe environment, where they can take that, what they have learned from the show and have conversations. >> it is also a tough environment. i e-mailed you before i went to see it. i said, i have a daughter that's almost 11. do you think you should bring her? >> i thought, i'm not sure. when i thought it, i saw exactly, i'm not sure. some of what happens to girls in the world is pretty ugly. >> i think girls 12 and over should see the play. i was just doing the 1 billion rising tour that we will talk about. i was in mexico city. i was with one of the women there that is fighting sex trafficking and human trafficking which $6 billion a year industry. we were just walking down the streets. there were girls, 9, 10, 11, 12, who had been sold, who had been kidnapped, raped 60 times a day. the kind of lives of women, girls across the planet is so varied. it is all part of the same story, girls not having agency over their bodies. >> on the one hand, you have monologues, often global girls telling about horrific conditions like that sexual
. the takeover talk is just ahead. >>> just because we're stuck in a real tough environment right now with that darn fiscal cliff deadline looming, three weeks away, our political leaders getting absolutely nowhere -- >> buy buy buy! >> sell sell sell! >> it doesn't mean we stop searching for opportunities to make money. even in the most dismal markets there are always stocks that have the ability to go higher. just got to find them. takes a lot of work. one i've been doing a lot of work on, it's called dst systems. dog sam tom. now, dst is not a great business. hmm. but i think it could be a terrific stock. the reason? i see number signs suggesting that dst could be preparing itself for a sale. and if not, it sure as heck should be. but even if dst doesn't get bought out, it has a fabulous story. it's a tale that we've repeated over and over again. it's one that's made big money in a number of stocks for us. see, dst, which is just a terrible name for a company, but that's what they call themselves, is a company where the whole is currently worth a lot less than the parts. now, in re
with a disability and part of an unprecedented exodus. >> the environment is toxic. officers can't speak their minds about what is going on. the chief didn't listen. city hall doesn't care what he have to say. >> this former police officer retired on disability. he and the counsel majority supported the reform policies, including pay cuts, and voter approved pension reforms. >> it's not about this city and the mayor, what it's about is keeping our city afloat. dealing with a budget situation that has been a disaster and saying what are we going to do to fix it. >> police officers say the fix is a disaster and the only thing two sides can seem to agree on is that this staffing shortage here is real. the department is authorized to have more than 11017 sworn officers there are 44 new recruits in the pipeline. the union says if you add up people who have left or planned to leave, 53, it's a number gain the department can't wayne win. >> we call it voting with fee. they're walking out. we can't strike. or do job actions. only way to send a message is to leave. >> tina says no amount of recruiting will r
and that -- those caring environments. but i think what this study is doing is it's really looking at what the reality is. the causes are a problem. poverty, trauma. fixing those is difficult. you have to lower crime, right? you have to get people jobs so that they get out of poverty. but what this report is looking at very specifically is a small subset of our society. young men and boys of color. specifically. and what they -- what their circumstances are, what their status is, and what it is that the legislature, communities, schools, our health system need to do to address the issues that these men and boys are facing. >> because when they suffer, it really affects all of us in terms of long-term productivity, the kinds of state services they need. local services. and we all fund that as taxpayers. i think we all have a stake. did the study talk about any possible solutions? are there any models that they cite as good examples of programs for young people? >> they cited programs across the state. many of them actually in the bay area and specifically in oakland where oakland is already
to reduce the overall load of pesticides in our environment that workers and farmers are exposed to and make our way into our air and water so those are important reductions that go beyond our own home and can affect everybody's health. some tips there are to choose hormone-free meats and milks in particular, to go with organic dried beans or organic frozen fruits or vegetables, some of our colleagues have the dirty dozen of foods to almost always buy organic and the clean 15, which are foods that you can kind of skip the organic because they have a stronger protective, like a ban ban na which has such a big peel, keeps those pesticides out, so if you're working on an economy of scale, you know, go with organic with the ones that have the highest levels of pesticides. our website has a link to those tips so i can show you where that would be. and now we're going to pop into the living room and talk about flame retardants which are an important issue for any firefighters who are working in the field because it's those burns that are going to create exposures, so as folks in the home are think
and giving the military a chance to work with the civilian authority in a non-crisis environment so that when they have to do it anywhere in the world, they've got one extra training day. that's the way we look at it, it's all one extra training day. you add all that up, we have a lot better chance when we need it. with that, i'm going to bring up dejon and take over the panel and i'll talk to you shortly. >> thank you, rob. the panelists we have represent a broad group of participants, some of them participated themselves and some of them had individuals in their organizations participate. and i want them to start with an introduction of who they are, a little bit about their own background, so you understand the lens they were looking through when they were providing some of their answers today. starting with our 3 panelists that were part of our command and control exercise then we'll hear from our 3 panelists that were in our communications drill. >> lieutenant commander mike kress, operations officer at naval beach group 1, i was a coach during the exercise. we supported the exercise
in that environment and how we can work out those gaps. >> yeah, i would agree. i think my take away would be that we should exercise together, small table tops initially and we can always develop larger ones, to really understand the capabilities and further plan and also how integration would work during a big disaster. >> so first i would tell my boss, major general steve, sir, this was a very successful demonstration of our medical surge cape pblt and it was well done. but now we need to evolve and keep moving this forward. what we did on this particular time was stand-alone demonstrations of our particular capabilities. i think the next thing we need to do is a joint demonstration. for example, our shock trauma has many similarities to a dmat that might be a next step in the evolution of this type event. it also, after discussing with several members of the hospitals during the tour yesterday, it's clear that there are many other civilian military training opportunities that exist. those can be maybe collaboration between medical personnel in military and civilian hospitals and many other opt
person into that environment without that data. >> got it. >> sometimes knowledge is power, but it can work against people. the natural inclination is to go to go to the path of least resistance. >> they stop thinking creatively as well. >> the way to prevent it from happening is here, this is your territory as long as you hit this quota. >> grit ad vice, thank you. >>> a question about dealing with the competition. >> i have been in business for over 25 years and recently, i had people say horrible, negative things about my product and my business. i wanted to stop. what can i do about it? >> it's hard right now. someone says something and it can be multiplied by social media. do you ignore it or get it face on? >> welcome to success. if you are not having people say rotten things about you. if people are saying rotten things about you, you are doing rotten stuff. or you are being successful. i presume she isn't doing rotten stuff. people are saying things because you are successful. >> how do you counter act it? >> set up global arts so you get a ping when something happens. then a m
the new jobs come, from but we have got to have an environment that creates jobs for everyone and you've done the studies yourself to show that increasing taxes on the top 2%, the portion of that that falls into small business owners who actually pass that through their personal income, is small and the portion of those that actually employs several workers is small, so i'm not arguing that taxes should go up for the rich. that's somebody else's argument to have. my point is it's not going to crush the economy to do so. >> so much heat of the conversation is just around the taxes for the rich. the jobs numbers, rear view mirror. >> absolutely. >> talking about how to fix it and how we're going to buttress the recovery. >> now we look at the future. >> ali velshi, thanks. >>> up next, america's oldest dictionary has announced the words of the year. can you tell it was an election year. which one was the most popular search in 2012. the answer after the break. health care system i wae spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my
to make for a much safer environment. we've got new signage and pavement markings to make that clear. as everybody was stuck on the subway, i rode my bike yesterday and rode passed it. it's a significant safety improvement, not bust for cyclists, but for f line operators. it's a very busy area. we have 120 people -- it's about a third of the left turns off of market street during rush hour, our cyclists. so, they're taking a whole lot of vehicles off the road by being on their bikes. this will enable them to do so safety and connective. we have the greenway signal times for bicycle speed. so, small but significant safety improvement there.
the rapidly changing environment of the neighborhood. the chair of the cac will tell you more about this plan following my comments. the revised plan says that the firm work for the rfp issued earlier this year on july 9th, the rfp included four program areas. number one, the development on housing coordination program, two, a neighborhood and business coordination program, three, a community council, and four, community action grants coordination program. for the development in housing coordination program, it was intended to, one, coordinate with city agencies, community based organizations, and developers to provide an analysis of soma housing stock, plan development and potential displacement, and two, to facilitate and provide leadership development and education to low-income residents regarding housing and development issues. most staff and the cac reviewed the proposals and is recommending $100,000 to fund the agency neighborhood design proposal to provide analysis and communication and leadership development services and $60,000 to partially fund the veterans equity center proposal t
an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with t
impact of carbon emissions on our environment. consider more ecofriendly means of transportation such as traveling by bicycle, turtle, or robotic vacuum cleaner. a message from the national message council. >> oh, look at the puppy. don't forget to fly me to the moon sunday 9:00 eastern with neil cavuto. i'm john roberts. good night from washington. charles and i are going to watch the new star trek trailer right now online. >> shepard: this is "the fox report." the supreme court is about to take up gay marriage and one decision could potentially effect every state in the union. more unrest in a critical middle east nation as protesters march on othe palace in egypt and call for the president to resign. thousands of protesters calling for the egyptian leader to get out of office. that president's supporters making new promises of revenge. tonight, the fight outside the presidential palace. and the future of an entire nation in the balance. two radio dj's recently called british hospital and impersonated the queen to ask about kate middleton's pregnancy and for a nurse that answer
of the problem. >> he watched this video. >> if that is true, it is a hostile environment and the courts are trying to get high schools to remedy this or they suffer damage. >> obviously i didn't want to live that day. >> if you hear a child saying this you have to investigate it. there are some tax cuts don't stop and do take their life. >> it seems like a culture of this. >> samantha and autumn hope they can make a difference by speaking out. >> we don't want other kids to feel the same way that we're feeling. >> now, the girls' parents say they allowed their daughters to go on camera because they thought it was important for them to speak out. police have told them the investigation will go to the district attorney next week. >> just breaks my heart. what about the boys and their family? >> we did look into that. we are told they are being raised by their dad and he is disabled. according to the police report which we have he says the school never informed him what the boys were targeting the girls and through the disdepartment, dana, he told us he does not want to comment. >> all rig
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$1,000 holiday bonus cash. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their
energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> a lot of people are making financial decisions based on what's going to happen if the u.s. goes over the so-called fiscal cliff. as christine romans reports, some homeowners could face a big tax bill. >> reporter: one in three homes in the third quarter sold short meaning you sell for less than you owe on it. right now you don't owe taxes on the forgiven debt. on the other side of the fiscal cliff you do. the mortgage forgiveness debt relief act gives homeowners a tax break on unpaid mortgage debt. it expires unless congress acts. >> the average amount homeowners are s
. the environmental community can see a reduction in the amount of carbon and an improvement in the environment as well as conservatives can see the idea of leaving it more resources at home and sending less of our wealth abroad. this is a way of doing something different, which is creating a consensus to get something done in the next congress. we are excited for the next congress and to work with all legislators to implement these recommendations and see them through to their felon. i would like to call fred smith, the chairman and founder of fedex. he really needs no introduction. but the truth is fedex and what it is done in our economy is groundbreaking. they are the clipper ships of the modern age. what they see in terms of the economic growth of our country, because they touch every industry, as well as providing the transportation to making our economy grow, i think he is well-suited to discuss this issue. i thank him for being the co- chair since 2006 and joining with general kelley and myself to do this. thank you. >> thank you. i became involved in the council out of self-interest. b
, stimulus campaign. if we were to try that or attempt that in this environment, forget about whether we reach a deal by the end of the year on the so-called cliff, that is what will send the world spending into recession. my thoughts. >> first of all, we don't have the money to pay for the past two deficits. i don't believe weevil have the money for the current spending related to sandy. there's not a tax for that, pretty sure. to the point to have the additional costs which would have to be hundreds and hundreds of billions of dollars, where's that's coming from? unless they use taxes on fuels to be the solution, that, at least, in theory, does not cost the government money. it doesn't mean it passes or have other effects. neil: cost money? >> not economy, but it will not look like they need o spend to solve the problem if that's the way it goes. neil: [inaudible] >> yeah, we're broke. we're turn your pockets inside out, it's over. no money. neil: you got the point across. thank you, both, very much. washington, we have a problem. don't think so? here's it's straight from the real guy
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